Oct

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : October 30, 2014

Monitor Photo/Erik Walsh A monolith and bronze plaque dedicates the repurposed old bridge in the memory of former Kemp City Councilman Jerry Hazelip.

Monitor Photo/Erik Walsh
A monolith and bronze plaque dedicates the repurposed old bridge in the memory of former Kemp City Councilman Jerry Hazelip.


By Erik Walsh
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–The morning air was still cool when Kemp Mayor Laura Hanna Peace stood before a small crowd of Kemp faithful gathered at the Kemp City Park Oct. 24 to dedicate the new performance arts stage to the memory of former Kemp City Councilman Jerry Hazelip.
Peace made herself comfortable on the new performance arts stage, declining a chair and a microphone in favor of a more intimate speech. She fought back tears in her eyes, as she told stories of Hazelip from the “good ‘ole days” and recounted the things he did for the community.
The idea to renovate the steel bridge and repurpose it as a focal point for musical performances was among Hazelip’s last acts on the council before he suffered a heart attack Feb. 19. He died a week later at Dallas Presbyterian Hospital. Hazelip served two full terms on the Kemp City Council.
After the touching words were shared, Peace gave the honors of unveiling a monolith with Hazelip’s likeness on it to his longtime friend and companion, Rick Norris. Hazelip’s vision of putting music on the stage was also realized that day, as Seven Points performing artist Larry Penny sung some country songs before Peace spoke.
The inscription on the monolith reads: This stage is dedicated to the memory of Jerry Wayne Hazelip in appreciation for his service to the community he loved. As an example to all, he served his community, and those in it, without hesitation or regret. He was a trusted neighbor, a true friend and a helper to those in need, both man and beast alike. Jerry was always ready with a bright smile, hearty laugh or warm embrace to lift those around him. Thank you Jerry for your hard work, civil leadership and love for your community.
Then it ends in a quote from The Lorax by Dr. Seuss: “Unless someone cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”
“You are missed.”

Oct

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : October 30, 2014

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson Laynee Tanksley, daughter of fallen first responder Scott Tanksley and widow Wendi Tanksley, perform the ceremonial coin toss before the Kemp Homecoming game Oct. 24. The coin is  uniquely designed for the 2014 Kemp Homecoming and  was presented to Laynee and the Tanksley family after the toss.

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson
Laynee Tanksley, daughter of fallen first responder Scott Tanksley and widow Wendi Tanksley, perform the ceremonial coin toss before the Kemp Homecoming game Oct. 24. The coin is uniquely designed for the 2014 Kemp Homecoming and was presented to Laynee and the Tanksley family after the toss.


By Erik Walsh
Monitor Sports Editor

KEMP–The Kemp Yellowjackets homecoming game didn’t end with a Cinderella story, falling to the visiting Elkhart Elks 41-3.
Elkhart scored first, shortly after the six-minute mark of the first quarter with a 51-yard touchdown run (PAT good) to give them the early 7-0 lead.
Elkhart stopped Kemp’s next drive and ran into the Kemp punter, forcing an automatic first down for the Yellowjackets. The home team didn’t take full advantage of the situation and after running the clock down a bit, elected to punt to Elkhart again. The rest of the first was quiet with neither team scoring or moving the ball much on offense.
The Elks pushed themselves into a 14-0 lead in the second quarter after capping a 50-plus yard drive with a one-yard touchdown run midway through the second quarter (PAT good).
After a nice kickoff return to midfield, Kemp coughed up a fumble on a running play that was cleanly picked up by an Elkhart defender and ran all the way to the endzone for a 46-yard touchdown (PAT no good). The lengthened lead sucked much of the energy out of the homecoming crowd and gave the Elks a 20-0 lead.
Both teams settled down after the pair of touchdowns and exited the field for halftime with the score 20-0 Elkhart.
After halftime performances by both schools’ marching bands, Kemp put together its best offensive drive of the evening midway through the third quarter. The ’Jackets strung together a series of passing plays by Calbert Hukill and running plays from David Dennis and Braxton Watters to fall just a few yards short of a touchdown. Facing fourth down Head Coach Brandon Hankins elected to go for the field goal, putting Kemp on the board for a 20-3 ball game.
Elkhart scored three more touchdown the rest of the night; a 42-yard run with two minutes remaining in the third quarter, a three-yard run midway through the fourth and a 52-yard bomb touchdown pass in the final minutes.
“We haven’t had the outcomes we had hoped, but we are going to continue to play our hardest,” Hankins said.
The loss drops Kemp to 0-8 on the year. Kemp will host the Malakoff Tigers Friday night with kickoff scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m. The game is senior night for the Yellowjackets.

Oct

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : October 30, 2014

Courtesy Photo Lucky, after being adoption, relaxes in her “furrever” home in Mesquite.

Courtesy Photo
Lucky, after being adoption, relaxes in her “furrever” home in Mesquite.


Special to The Monitor
MABANK–Eustace Intermediate School sixth grader Nicole Bechard, 10, and her mom, Gail, rescued an injured kitten in early July.
The gray tabby kitten, named Lucky by Bechard, was recently adopted by a Mesquite women and has a playmate named Samson, a black amputee kitten adopted from the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake (HSCCL) last spring.
Bechard heard Lucky crying under an abandoned building in the Mabank area but was unable to coax it out.
Her mom crawled under the building and upon rescuing the kitten, noticed it had wire wrapped around its left hind leg, nearly cutting it off. The leg was severely infected.
A neighbor helped them remove the wire, and the wound was cleaned and bandaged.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake Cat Team heard about the situation via social media and contacted the family to offer their assistance.
Lucky was taken to the Kaufman Veterinary Center by HSCCL Volunteer Cat Team Lead Lynn Ackerman for evaluation and treatment.
Lucky underwent surgery for an amputation of the left hind limb.
Lucky’s surgical costs were covered by a grant given to HSCCL from Trinity Valley Electric Co-op for feline medical care.
Ackerman picked up Lucky the next morning, took her in as a foster kitten and provided post-operative care while she recuperated.
After Lucky recovered and was spayed, Ackerman took Lucky back to see Bechard and her mom.
They were very happy to see Lucky had survived and was thriving, due in no small part to their rescue efforts.
Lucky was adopted soon afterwards.
Lucky is now in her new home in Mesquite and Bechard knows the good feeling that comes after helping an animal in distress.