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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the OranWhite Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.
  Rep. Betty Brown draws two conservative opponents
By Michael V. Hannigan
Monitor Staff Writer

ATHENS–It looks like Henderson County conservatives will have a variety of choices in the District 4 State Representative race this year.
Six-term incumbent Betty Brown has announced she is running for re-election. She has drawn a primary challenger in her former aide, Lance Gooden.
In addition, Melissa Pehl-Hill has announced she will run for the office as an independent on a “Constitutional Conservative” platform.
Brown and Gooden will square off first in the Republican primary March 2. The winner will face Hill in the General Election in November.
No Democratic opponent has filed for the race.
Brown said she is seeking her seventh term to give District 4 a voice in re-districting next session.
“In the next session, the main issue will be re-districting,” Brown said. “I have been through re-districting, and Austin rewards someone with tenure. If we elect a freshman, our area will not have a voice in the process.”
Brown also plans to continue her campaign for voter photo ID legislation in the next legislative session. A bill she authored did not pass last session.
“Voter fraud is real,” Brown said. “I am determined to make sure that only those here legally can vote, and that they only vote once.”
Brown said she has worked “to balance the budget and cut wasteful spending.” She has been recognized by Texas Right to Life, Texas Association of Business, Texans for Fiscal Responsibility, Texas Medical Association, National Rifle Association, Texas Municipal Police Association, Texas Farm Bureau and other leading groups.
Gooden said Brown has “lost touch” with her constituents.
“There is a disconnect between the Betty Brown that runs around Kaufman and Henderson counties calling herself a conservative and the Betty Brown that goes to Austin and votes against the conservative values we hold dear,” Gooden said. “I’m not claiming to have all the answers, but I can tell you that it’s high time we have a representative who actually acts like a conservative, instead of one who just talks about it.”
He said his experience in the legislature was one of the key factors in his decision to run.
“If you spend a little time at the capitol, it becomes abundantly clear that there are two kinds of State Representatives,” Gooden continued. “Those who represent the values and beliefs of their districts and those who have completely lost touch with the people they represent.
“I like Betty a lot as a person, but her record paints a pretty clear picture that she has lost her way,” Gooden added. “We need a representative whose first priority is to represent the conservative interests of their district. I can deliver that to our community.”
Gooden is an insurance and risk management consultant. He grew up in Terrell and graduated as the valedictorian of Terrell High School where his father, Tom Ed Gooden, was the head football coach.
After earning two degrees from the University of Texas in Finance and Government, he went to work as an insurance broker for energy and energy-related companies, negotiating for them in the insurance marketplace and helping to protect them from lawsuits and other business risks.
Hill also believes that conservative values are being ignored by politicians.
“I, like many Americans, still believe in the Constitution, small government, and people working to feed their families rather than the constantly expanding monster that has become our government,” she said. “I also believe that we are a Judeo-Christian nation founded on the word of God and that through that foundation we are still the greatest nation on Earth.
“I believe that George Washington was right, that a two party system would be the downfall of this great nation,” Hill added. “The very fact that many can’t tell the difference in the parties is further proof of the inherent necessity to expand the playing field of politics in order to find true representation for the people.”
Hill said she has been a conservative her whole life.
“I have been a Republican all of my life, and it saddens me that the Republican Party has lost the core values of the late Ronald Reagan, thus forcing me to run as an independent candidate,” she said. “I hope everyone will look beyond party labels to find who best represents their interests and remember voting is as much a duty as it is a privilege so please vote in November to save this state and this country from socialism.”
Hill lives with her husband, David, and the couple’s children in the woods of East Texas outside of Athens.
She is the National Co-Chairman of ROAR-USA, which is a nationwide movement to restore the Republican Party back to its traditional conservative values. She is also the co-founder of the Make-A-Statement Project, which is a movement to rekindle the flames of freedom in the hearts and minds of the American people.
Along with her husband, she hosts the Make-A-Statement Radio Show, where they interview prominent figures in politics, industry and American life in general.

Healthful New Year’s resolutions
Special to The Monitor
KAUFMAN–With each New Year, the age-old practice of making New Year’s resolutions seems to loom for many.
Using the New Year as a time for reflection and resolving to make changes is a practice that actually dates back more than two thousand years, so there’s been plenty of time to “get it right.”
However, for many people, New Year’s resolutions that require a substantial commitment without yielding quick results are soon abandoned.
This seems especially true when it comes to exercise.
“Lack of adequate physical activity and exercise can lead to poor circulation and eventually to obesity and heart disease, among other illnesses,” a cardiologist on the medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Kaufman, Dr. Shashank Krishnaji Dengle said.
“But with proper exercise and diet, many problems can be avoided or even reversed over time,” he added.
The American Heart Association recommends moderate-intensity aerobic activity for a minimum of 30 minutes on five days each week or vigorous-intensity aerobic activity for a minimum of 20 minutes on three days each week.
Combinations of moderate-intensity activity, usually equivalent to a brisk walk that accelerates the heart, and vigorous-intensity activity, exemplified by jogging, also satisfy the recommendation.
For more information, visit the American Heart Association’s Web site.
When thinking about exercise, don’t overlook easy ways to incorporate physical activity in daily routine.
• Combine exercise with other activities, such as watching your favorite TV program.
• Take a short, brisk walk before breakfast, after dinner or both. Use the time to plan or recap the day. Start with 5-10 minute and work up to 30 minutes over time.
• Walk the dog.
• Walk or bike to the corner store instead of driving
• Park further away when shopping at the mall, wear walking shoes, and sneak in an extra lap or two before you leave.
• Take stairs instead of the elevator. Or get off a few floors early and take stairs the rest of the way.
• Brainstorm with work colleagues while taking a walk.
• Walk while waiting for the plane at the airport.
• Participate in or start a recreation league at your company.

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
The domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then will cause another similar change, and so on. My name is Domino, and I got my name not only because I’m black and white like a domino tile, but also because my outgoing, cheerful personality causes my doggie roommates to smile. This also causes our human friends to smile, which even causes the kitties in the cat room to smile.
I am an 8-month-old male Pointer/Terrier mix. I love children, other dogs, and even get along great with kitties. I’ve had all my shots and am ready to be adopted. If you’d like to experience the domino effect, I am sure to put a forever smile on your face when you take me to my forever home.
I currently live with a foster family, so if you would like to meet me, call my friends at the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake at (903) 432-3422 to make an appointment. You can also email them at dogshsccl@yahoo.com.
 

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 


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