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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the Oran White Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

  WCR hears how to find life’s balance
By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–Members of the local chapter of the Women’s Council of Realtors pondered priorities and time budgets as they begin a new and hopefully more prosperous 2010 during their first meeting of the year.
Methodist pastor Chris Schoolcraft related the formula he follows in keeping his work, family and career in balance at a breakfast meeting Jan. 20.
“I follow a 70/30 rule,” Schoolcraft said – he tries to limit his work and career activities to 70 percent of his time and spends 30 percent in enriching his personal and family life.
“Name those things that hold value to you. Write them down. Track them. How much time and money do you spend on these on a weekly and monthly basis?” he asked. “That will show what you are really investing in. Then make changes accordingly.”
Schoolcraft explained he finds it helpful to divide his day into five time frames, and budget those sections following the 70/30 rule.
He reminded them that meeting with clients and associates for training, or over meals or after-hours, also counts as part of the 70 percent.
Of the 70 percent dedicated to work, 70 percent of that should be doing things you enjoy and only 30 percent the parts of your job that you like least, he added.
Schoolcraft pointed out everyone needs help and needs someone who will make them accountable to their own priorities.
For Schoolcraft, this is his wife. When his 70/30 rule moves into 80/20 and then 90/10, his wife confronts him in what he describes as a “come to Jesus meeting,” and makes him face the facts and make the necessary changes.
“It’s hard, not just for you, but for pastors, too. It is a constant struggle (to keep life in balance),” he said.
“I attend at the side of a lot of deathbeds, and I’ll tell you, I’ve yet to hear one of these regret that they couldn’t spend one more day at the office or make one more sale,” he said.
He also suggested examining our personal definitions of success. Are they truly yours, or something passed down to you by others?
“For me, if my children grow into responsible, caring adults, that’s success. If I truly know my wife on a day-to-day basis and she knows me, that is success. Define your own success and live it,” he said.
With the 30 percent reserved for self-development, he strongly suggests including regular activities that feed your spirit. Time and money spent to inspire and call us to a higher purpose pays dividends in how we relate to others, he pointed out.
Our relationships with family members, clients, customers and acquaintances “speaks about where we are spiritually,” he said.

H1N1 vaccine importance noted
Special to The Monitor
TYLER–We are at a critical moment in the fight against the 2009 H1N1 influenza.
We are fortunate that the influenza-like illnesses have gone down in the recent weeks but flu experts warn that we should prepare for a possible third wave of the H1N1 influenza.
The number of people who get vaccinated against influenza typically drops after November.
Therefore, as we face the challenges of the novel H1N1 Influenza virus, the Northeast Texas Public Health District (NETPHD) will focus on educating East Texans on the importance of the flu vaccine.
With more than 118 million doses of the H1N1 flu vaccine having been made available everyone that has not yet been vaccinated is encouraged to do so.  
Though this has been an unprecedented year in terms of the number of people who have received both flu vaccinations, most people still have not gotten the 2009 H1N1 vaccine, which is still readily available. 
The fact is if more people are vaccinated, the disease is less likely to spread in the coming months. 
“The most effective way that the members of the East Texas Community can protect themselves against the H1N1 virus is to receive the H1N1 vaccination.” says George Roberts, CEO of NETPHD.
 If you have any concerns regarding the influenza vaccine or questions about how to find a vaccination location in the East Texas area, please call NETPHD at (877) 244-9641.

 

Dad urges Kiwanis members to help with MDA fund-raisers
Monitor Staff Reports
GUN BARREL CITY–Raising money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association goes year-round, not just on Labor Day weekend, the Cedar Creek Lake Kiwanis club heard Wednesday.
KiwanisBailey.jpg (167263 bytes)Mark Bailey told club members he is the father of Eustace Middle School sixth-grader Roland Bailey, one of four boys with muscular dystrophy (MD) in the lake area.

Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
Groom & Sons’ Hardware employee Mark Bailey speaks to Cedar Creek Kiwanis members about the Muscular Dystrophy Association and what it has done for his family during the club's weekly luncheon Wednesday.

Roland (the subject of a December, 2008, feature story in The Monitor) has Duechenne Muscular Dystrophy, one of more than 40 different MD diseases that attacks the body’s muscles, and has been confined to a wheelchair since age 9.
Roland is widely known as the Eustace Independent School District’s No. 1 fan, and is allowed access to the sideline during football games. He also gets a front-row seat at other athletic contests.
“He is the biggest competitor you will ever meet,” his dad told club members during their weekly luncheon.
His Head Start teacher, Stephanie Kirkhart, was the first to notice the then 4-year-old having difficulty doing some routine tasks, such as climbing steps to reach the classroom sink.
A physical therapist recommended a specialist, who, in turn, sent Roland to the Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas, where Dr. Susan Iannaccone (one of the leading MD researchers in the nation) diagnosed Duechenne MD.
Mark Bailey said he was a former professional powerlifter, and had harbored high hopes that Roland would be an outstanding football or baseball player.
“But, I was raised to take whatever happens and go with it,” he said.
Wearing a “Stride and Ride” T-shirt, Bailey explained the program urged individuals to raise at least $65 and walk around the mall (or some similar public place) to show solidarity with MD patients.
“It used to cost $65 per minute for research, so people were asked to raise money for one minute of research,” he said. “Now, it costs $80 a minute, because things have gone up.”
Funding pressures have forced the Muscular Dystrophy Association into some painful cutbacks. “The only time anyone hears about MDA is Labor Day weekend,” Bailey noted.
For example, Roland used to get $2,000 to help purchase a new wheelchair, but that won’t be available next year when Roland is scheduled to get a new chair, Bailey said.
“His wheelchair costs $30,000,” Bailey added.
A year ago this month, Roland underwent surgery to correct scoliosis (curving of the spine).
The scoliosis was leading to breathing problems, because Roland was bent over. Now, his breathing is near 100 percent, but he can no longer feed himself, being unable to raise his arms high enough, Bailey said.
“Most deaths with his disease comes from not being able to breathe or unable to cough,” he added.
The Eustace ISD has adopted Roland and continually holds fund-raisers to help the Bailey family meet expenses.
“Roland’s Racers,” for example, has raised more than $10,000 in the past five or six years, Bailey said.
“The Eustace school district really supports him,” Bailey said. “They make him part of the team, and he really eats it up.
“The kids on the team know that if he could be out there with him, he would,” he added.
Research is looking for an effective treatment or cure. “Stem cell research is a big part of this,” Bailey said.
“He’s probably too old for a cure, but if they could find a way to prolong his life, that would help,” he added. “The life expectancy of a Duechennes patient is around 16 to 25 years.”
Kiwanis president Denise York presented Bailey with a donation on behalf of the club.
In club business, members:
• heard candidates are scheduled to speak to the club the next two meetings.
Jan. 27, Henderson County District Clerk candidate Amiee Freeman is scheduled to visit, and Kaufman County judge candidate Bruce Wood is scheduled to speak Feb. 3.
• discussed plans for the club’s annual Pancake Day fund-raiser, set Tuesday, Feb. 23. As in the past, breakfasts will be delivered to businesses in the immediate Cedar Creek Lake area between 6 and 11 a.m.

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
The domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then will cause another similar change, and so on. My name is Domino, and I got my name not only because I’m black and white like a domino tile, but also because my outgoing, cheerful personality causes my doggie roommates to smile. This also causes our human friends to smile, which even causes the kitties in the cat room to smile.
I am an 8-month-old male Pointer/Terrier mix. I love children, other dogs, and even get along great with kitties. I’ve had all my shots and am ready to be adopted. If you’d like to experience the domino effect, I am sure to put a forever smile on your face when you take me to my forever home.
I currently live with a foster family, so if you would like to meet me, call my friends at the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake at (903) 432-3422 to make an appointment. You can also email them at dogshsccl@yahoo.com.
 

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 

 



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