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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the Oran White Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

  Police win $117K grant to form Emergency Response Team
Special to The Monitor
KEMP–The Kemp Police Department has received news that its $117,454.79 grant request was approved.
Administered by the Criminal Justice Division of the Governor’s Office, the grant allows the Kemp Police Department to take a regional lead in forming an emergency response team (ERT, similar to SWAT team) to combat threats to schools and community centers and to more safely serve arrest and search warrants.
“We’re thrilled the Governor’s Office took notice of our efforts to improve the professionalism, efficiency and effectiveness of the Kemp Police Department, and validated our hard work,” police chief Richard Clemmo said.
“This funding fills a serious void of a local ERT in the Cedar Creek Lake area.
“It’s a great day for Kemp and the entire lake region, and it’s a real, bad day for local illegal narcotics retailers,” Clemmo added.
Other agencies participating include the Mabank Police Department, Mabank ISD Police Department, Kemp ISD Police Department and the Kaufman ISD Police Department.
The Van Zandt Sheriff’s Department has already expressed an interest to utilizing the ERT for the southwest portion of Van Zandt County.
“Chief Clemmo and Sgt. Law have done an outstanding job at coordinating with the other agencies in the region to form the ERT, and then putting in the long hours required to get this grant funding approved,” Kemp Mayor Matt Ganssle said.
“This grant will ensure our schools and the public in southern Kaufman County, and around the entire lake, will have access to prompt, specialized police services when major situations develop.
“It will also keep our kids safe, by complementing other regional law enforcement efforts to combat the effects of drug addiction,” Ganssle added.
The grant includes nearly $115,000 for equipment and an additional $2,500 to pay for specialized training.
The Kemp Police Department and the cooperating agencies have one year to complete preparations for full deployment of the ERT.
The JAG grant is funded by the federal money through the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

 

Food handlers course set
Special to The Monitor
KAUFMAN–A new food handlers course accredited by the Texas Department of State Health Services is being offered by Texas AgriLife Extension Service.
“It’s In Your Hands” is being brought to the area by Texas AgriLife Extension, Kaufman County and the city of Kaufman.
The classes are scheduled from 2-4 p.m. March 10-12, at the Kaufman County Library, 3790 S. Houston St., Kaufman, TX 75142.
This two-hour course is highly recommended for all food service employees to help promote the service of safe food.
Practices discussed include good personal hygiene, cross contamination, and time and temperature abuse.
To register for the course, call the Extension office at (972) 932-9069.
Registration can also be done in-person the day of the course.
The cost is $15 per person and must be paid in full before the course begins.
Individuals with disabilities who require auxiliary aide service or accommodation are encouraged to contact the office within five working days prior to the program.
Educational programs of Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin.

 

It’s not too late to be vaccinated against H1N1
By David L. Lakey, M.D.
Special to The Monitor

AUSTIN–People have been asking me if it’s too late to get the H1N1 flu vaccine and do any good. As a doctor, father and commissioner of health, this question concerns me.
The answer is no, it is absolutely not too late to get vaccinated. H1N1 is still killing people. It is still hospitalizing people. The virus is still circulating.
We have a powerful tool in our arsenal against it – a vaccine that is safe, effective and now plentiful. People who have not been vaccinated should do so now.
We are concerned about what might be around the corner, especially if people lose interest in being vaccinated and another wave of illness hits us harder, faster and stronger because we became complacent.
We have weathered two major waves of the illness so far, one last spring and one last fall. We have a window of opportunity before a possible third wave. Now is the perfect time to get vaccinated.
We don’t know what to expect from H1N1 flu.
It is unpredictable. It might come back with a vengeance tomorrow. It might disappear this spring.
From past pandemics, we know that a resurgence of H1N1 early this year is very possible.
We need to stay ahead of it. It’s easier and smarter to prevent an illness than to combat it, once it has already taken hold.
Predicting the severity and occurrence levels of any flu is fairly impossible.
Traditional flu season is from October through mid-May.
The highest levels of seasonal flu in Texas usually occur in January and February, but not always. H1N1 only appeared last April.
We don’t know yet if it will follow any seasonal pattern, and much hinges on the natural immunity that the population is building up.
Texas has been on the front lines since the H1N1 virus was first identified in the U.S. last year. We reported some of the first cases and, unfortunately, the first deaths in the country.
In October, we began distributing the initial limited supply of vaccine using an unprecedented, highly targeted system through our state health department.
We have been diligently tracking deaths and hospitalizations of those with H1N1.
People who choose not to get vaccinated put themselves and those around them at risk, especially babies younger than six months, who are too young for the vaccination.
Nearly 200 babies younger than six months have been hospitalized with H1N1 in Texas. Sadly, deaths have occurred in every age group, young and old.
Though most H1N1 cases have been relatively mild, no flu should be dismissed as “just the flu.”
Many parents of children younger than 10 are due to take their kids for their second recommended dose. I suggest those parents also get themselves vaccinated at that time.
Physicians should continue to urge their patients to be vaccinated against H1N1 flu. Pregnant women in particular have had severe complications from this virus.
People with asthma, diabetes, heart disease, lung disease and other health conditions are at a higher risk, and should be vaccinated.
Older adults and seniors also have been shown to have complications when infected, and should be vaccinated.
The good news is we finally have enough vaccine.
We have a flu vaccine locator at TexasFlu.org to help people find doses close to them.
Pharmacies, doctor’s offices, local health departments and many schools have plenty of vaccine to go around.
We have been looking forward to reaching this point since the first dose arrived in Texas in early October.
The general public waited patiently as we targeted the scarce supply to those in the highest-priority groups, and then to other priority groups as supplies increased.
Now, there is enough for everyone who wants it.
We must take advantage of this supply. As more people get vaccinated, the less we need to worry about the spread of illness during a possible third wave.
Protect yourself. Protect each other.
Dr. David L. Lakey, M.D. is the Commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services.

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
The domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then will cause another similar change, and so on. My name is Domino, and I got my name not only because I’m black and white like a domino tile, but also because my outgoing, cheerful personality causes my doggie roommates to smile. This also causes our human friends to smile, which even causes the kitties in the cat room to smile.
I am an 8-month-old male Pointer/Terrier mix. I love children, other dogs, and even get along great with kitties. I’ve had all my shots and am ready to be adopted. If you’d like to experience the domino effect, I am sure to put a forever smile on your face when you take me to my forever home.
I currently live with a foster family, so if you would like to meet me, call my friends at the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake at (903) 432-3422 to make an appointment. You can also email them at dogshsccl@yahoo.com.
 

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 

 



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