Sunday, March 11, 2007

     

 

  ‘Idol’ hopeful advances
Chris Sligh, nephew of local Realtors David and Marie Sligh, makes final 12
Special to the Monitor
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Mention the popular “American Idol” show to David Sligh, and he will quickly tell you about his favorite nephew and idol contestant, Chris Sligh.

Courtesy Photo
American Idol finalist Chris Sligh, standing with his wife Sarah,
made the cut to the final 12 on the hit TV show airing on Fox TV Thursday night.

Thursday night, Sligh advanced to the final 12 contestants in the popular talent show.
David and his wife, Marie, are Cedar Creek Lake area residents.
The 28-year-old musician caught the attention of Idol judges Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson during auditions in Birmingham, Ala.
Chris is now one of the final 12 contestants vying for a $1 million recording contract as the next “American Idol.”
For his Birmingham audition, Chris sang “Kiss From a Rose” by Seal, and was quickly moved on to Hollywood.
Before his audition, he told the interviewers, “Some people tell me I look like Jack Osborne, some people say I look like Jack Black, but when I look in the mirror every morning, it’s not those people I see – it’s Christina Aguilera that I see in the mirror, and I think that’s who my body looks like most.”
Sligh’s humorous remarks prompted some people to suggest he might have a second career as a comedian, although it’s been his strong singing voice that has carried him to the finals.
However, Chris’ best line came when Jackson asked him why he was there.
“I really wanted to make David Hasselhoff cry,” he replied, referring to how Hasselhoff cried when Taylor Hicks won last years’ “American Idol 5.”
Numerous videos about Chris have popped up since he first appeared on television during the early “Idol” auditions.
A recent site, http://chrissligh.info/content/view/89/30/, says people are developing a condition called “Slighitis,” as they are so busy surfing the net for blogs about Chris, they can’t get any work done.
It has been an exciting American Idol season for David and Marie, who are Realtors with Johnson Monroe Realtors and agree 100 percent that “Slighitis” is a serious condition sweeping the nation.
“Being on Idol has long been a dream of Chris,” David said.
“Chris is a young man with morals and a commitment to his family and faith. He would be a great American Idol number six, but it won’t happen without the votes coming in” David added.
Chris, the son of David Sligh’s brother, Chuck and Susan Sligh, grew up in a U.S. military community in Wiesbaden, Germany, and currently resides with his wife Sarah in Greenville, S.C.

Courtesy Photo
Chris stands (far right) with his aunt Marie and uncle David Sligh, both local real estate agents.

 


New Eustace AD Wendel welcomed
Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
Eustace Athletic Booster Club president James Cox (front left) presents new Eustace Athletic Director Doug Wendel and wife Kara Wendel (holding son Drew) with a basket of T-shirts and other Bulldog fan items during a welcome for the Wendels at the Eustace High School main lobby Monday. Witnessing the exchange are (back row, from left) Booster Club members Melanie Oldham, Shelly Compton, Tammy Spain and Debbie McConathy.
 


Southside Bank opens new GBC building
Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
Southside Bank employees welcome visitors to the lobby of the bank’s new permanent building, located at the intersection of Main Street (State Highway 334) and Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City. Pictured are (from left, seated) Judy Shook and Chrissy Adams; (standing) Lea Ann Farmer, Cheyenne Lyons, branch manager Ralph Fortner, Kim Harris and Traci Hall. Lobby hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Fridays; drive-through hours are 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call (903) 887-8722.
 

Weather spotters train for severe storm season
By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer

MALAKOFF–The National Weather Service (NWS) relies heavily on satelite imagery and weather instrumentation to predict the movement of storms.

Coutesy Photo
First responders and amatuer radio operators studied cloud formations like this one, as part of a basic storm spotters class Tuesday in Malakoff.

However, it also depends on support from the general public to gather real-time observations. More than 230,000 volunteer storm spotters have been trained to date in the NWS SKYWARN program.
That’s why Meteorologist Gary Woodall presented what he called “the show” to about 35 First Responders and HAM radio operators at the senior citizen center in Malakoff Tuesday.
The class was organized by the HendersonCounty Emergency Management Office to prepare for the storm season, April-June.
Woodall showed slide after slide and video clips of developing storms, pointing out all the tell-tale signs a severe storm was developing.
After 45 minutes of instruction, an oral quiz, using more video clips, had everyone in the room acurately identifying cloud formations, such as beaver tails, anvils, rain feet, downbursts, updrafts, cloud walls and rain-free base.
Signs of strong updraft and rotation were also well-drilled.
The second half of the class reviewed what information to report and how to report it.
Basic severe weather safety was also covered. Storm spotters were warned to not get close to storms – what needs to be observed can be viewed from a distance.
SKYWARN storm spotters form the first line of defense in warning communities of severe weather. The efforts of these volunteers have given communities the precious gift of time – seconds and minutes that can help save lives.
Anyone with access to a telephone or HAM radio can participate in the SKYWARN program. Reports can be sbmitted through the internet on the local NWS Forecast Office web site.
Spotters include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and others. NWS encourages staff at hospitals, schools, churches, nursing homes and other key locales to become a spotter.
To set up a two-hour class for your group or local, call Woodall at (817) 831-1574 or e-mail him at gary.woodall@noaa.gov.