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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the OranWhite Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

  ‘Concert in the Dark’ set for March 27
By Barbara Gartman
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–The city of Kemp is taking part in the Global Earth Hour Campaign, planning a gala event in the city park featuring Texas singer, songwriter Austin Allsup, Saturday, March 27.
“Allsup is well known in Texas music circles,” Kemp Mayor Matt Ganssle said.
“He has played at Billy Bob’s in Fort Worth, Gilley’s and been heard statewide over favorite Texas radio stations,” Ganssle added.
A logo, “The Lights Go Out, The Music Goes On, The Earth Gets Saved,” emphasizes the goals of the global event.
“In this area, we are urging citizens to turn off their lights for an hour, starting at 8:30 p.m.” Ganssle explained.
“I thought it would be good for the city to join in the event,” he added.
Detail about the Earth Hour phenomenon may be viewed online at earthhour.org.
The Kemp concert begins at 8:30 p.m. and will take place in the City Park Pavilion.
At that time all electric lighting will be turned off, and tiki torches lit along with a few fire pits.
The lights out action is to prove that each of us can reduce our use of electricity adn so reduce the emission of greenhouse gases in the productionof electricity.
The park opens at 7:30 p.m. so everyone can take part in the family-friendly event which features a festival atmosphere, food and “green resources” for all ages to explore.
The city is combining its efforts with the Kemp Business & Civic Association, KCKL 95.9, and the Kaufman County Environmental Co-op.
Association president Diana Clemmo said various vendors plan to attend, offering folks plenty of choices in food and crafts to enjoy.
“Our business partners also include Kemp and Seven Points Dairy Queens, Comfort Suites, Full Moon Productions and Rugged CCTV,” Ganssle said..
“We were looking to have an event to provide good, family fun for all individuals, from high school to pre-school kids, citizens and visitors, including those from the bass tournament looking for something fun to do,” he added.
The event is free to the public and everyone is invited to bring their lawn chairs or blankets to rest on while they enjoy the music.
“This is one of the many Kemp events planned to help attract businesses and residents to our area,” Ganssle explained.


MHS students donate blood to save more than 300 lives

MHSbloodDoubleRed.jpg (184501 bytes)Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
MHS senior James Burkhalter reads the label on the side of a centrifuge machine as he gives “double red” during the drive. The centrifuge removes the heavier red blood cells and secures the lighter platelets and other blood plasma components in a collection bag at the front of the machine.

 

 

MHSblood-Brittany 3-18.jpg (110092 bytes)Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
Mabank High School senior Brittany Gaona grins as technician Glenda Guzman arranges tubes leading to the blood collection bag during the MHS March 12 blood drive. Gaona said this was the third time she has donated, having given during a drive last spring and this past fall.


MHSbloodGabby.jpg (101704 bytes)

 

 

 

Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
Mabank High School senior Gabby Costilla holds her arm up and a gauze pad in place after finishing her blood donation during a drive in the MHS auxiliary gym March 12. About 150 students signed up for the drive, with other visitors coming from Malakoff to donate, according to organizer Cris Cary. Carter BloodCare reported the drive drew 121 donors appear, with 98 units of whole blood collected. Another 20 donors gave 23 units of “double red” (see related photo at right), meaning the effort saved up to 363 lives.

 

 

 

Boomers and parents need to have ‘that talk’
Monitor Staff Reports
GUN BARREL CITY–It’s always difficult to start “that talk” with growing children, but it’s just as difficult when “that talk” is about an aging parent’s driving.
Home Instead Senior Care community service representative Brenda McCarty handed out a “how-to” book, “The 70-40 Rule,” to members of the Cedar Creek Lake Kiwanis club at the club’s weekly luncheon Wednesday.
One side has tips for senior parents on how to speak about important subjects with their Baby Boomer children. Flipped over, the “40-70 Rule” book offers tips to Boomers about starting conversations with their aging parents.
“Having ‘that talk’ is extremely difficult, especially when you’re talking about driving,” McCarty said.
Noting her mother is now 86, “I had to have the driving talk with her,” McCarty said. “I didn’t win.”
The important point is to begin talking now, she said.
“You want to start having that conversation before something comes up that has to be dealt with,” McCarty said.
Driving and allowing someone else to monitor bill-paying, medication use and other serious concerns does take away pieces of a senior adult’s independence, she pointed out.
“It’s a very, very touchy subject,” she said. “It eliminates that whole life-style that you’ve enjoyed all these years.”
The best way to begin conversations is to start early, she said.
“At 40, you need to start planning on how you will talk past the parent-child relationship,” she said.
All too often, it’s the parents who don’t want “to become a burden” to their children by giving up driving, or by talking about financial matters, such as wills and other end-of-life issues.
“If your parents have health issues – and we all do, at some point – you need a list of medications and diagnoses written down,” McCarty said.
A good place to put that list is in the freezer, where it’s out of the way, but still accessible by emergency medical responders, she said.
“There always needs to be something written down somewhere,” she said.
Seniors with major medical issues, such as diabetes, heart disease or serious allergies, should consider wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace to warn emergency responders about that specific health threat, McCarty noted.
More suggestions can be found at the website, www.4070talk.com, she said.
In club news, members:
• heard an update from past president Dr. Jeannie Caillet about the “quilts for kids” project being co-sponsored by the Children’s Miracle Network and Downy fabric softener.
Caillet showed some of a dozen quilts she had collected so far, noting individuals can work on them at home, or with quilting groups or churches.
“You can do them at home, and donate them as a group or as an individual,” she said. “I would very much like to get together as a group and take the quilts to the hospital.”
There is a special all-day quilting bee now scheduled at The Library at Cedar Creek Lake Tuesday, April 27, she announced.
• received a $74 check from Caillet as the club’s share of money collected “ringing the bell” for the Salvation Army kettle drive before Christmas. The club immediately donated the money back to the Salvation Army.
• heard treasurer Derek Hoelscher report the club did very well on its March 4 “pancake day” fund-raiser, despite having bad weather wipe out the original Feb. 23 date.
• were reminded of the club’s upcoming Saturday, May 1, “Krawfish Boil and Car Show” event in conjunction with the area chamber of commerce.

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
The domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then will cause another similar change, and so on. My name is Domino, and I got my name not only because I’m black and white like a domino tile, but also because my outgoing, cheerful personality causes my doggie roommates to smile. This also causes our human friends to smile, which even causes the kitties in the cat room to smile.
I am an 8-month-old male Pointer/Terrier mix. I love children, other dogs, and even get along great with kitties. I’ve had all my shots and am ready to be adopted. If you’d like to experience the domino effect, I am sure to put a forever smile on your face when you take me to my forever home.
I currently live with a foster family, so if you would like to meet me, call my friends at the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake at (903) 432-3422 to make an appointment. You can also email them at dogshsccl@yahoo.com.
 

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 

 



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