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Current Issue
Sunday,
April 24
, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 
Lake Area Billboard

East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.

Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.

Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.

Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.

Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.

Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets every Tuesday at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.

Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.

Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.

Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.

Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.

Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.

Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.

Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.

Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.

Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.

Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.

Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.

Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the Oran White Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.

West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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People, Places & Events

Traipse back in time at Scarborough Festival
Monitor Staff Reports
WAXAHACHIE–Now in its 31st season, the Scarborough Renaissance Festival continues to draw growing crowds.
Located just off Interstate 35E south of Waxahachie, the 30-acre-plus Scarborough Festival village provides a medieval look from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine, through Memorial Day for the young and old who visit.
Many visitors come in costume, and one can rent costumes just inside the main gate.

Monitor Photo/Kerry Yancey
At a gallop, a mounted knight chops a really naughty head of cabbage in half in a demonstration of martial skills prior to the mid-afternoon session of the joust. Jousts are held three times daily, both Saturday and Sunday, during the two-month run of the Scarborough Renaissance Festival.

Although the festival is officially set during the reign of King Henry VIII (1509-47), visitors’ costumes usually cover a wide range of historical epochs – from pre-Christian Vikings and Romans to Crusaders, Scotch Highlanders (1300s-1750s) and French Musketeers (late 1500s-early 1600s), with the occasional “Conan” style barbarian warrior and Native Americans.
One new costume look seen this year is “steampunk.”
A fast-growing science fiction sub-genre, “steampunk” takes the gritty and hard-edged computer-based culture of the near future (“cyberpunk”) and places that mindset and inventiveness into the age of steam, the late 1800s – think the old “Wild Wild West” TV show of the mid-1960s with even more futuristic inventions.
Visitors stroll around the village, watching a wide variety of shows on about a dozen different stages, while some artists perform in the lanes for the folks walking past.
More than 100 shops offering just about anything hand-made (or custom-designed), including jewelry, clothing, hats, arts and graphics, candles and bath accessories, furnishings and home accessories, musical instruments, pottery, books, toys and games, gifts and historically accurate medieval weaponry.
There are thrice-daily jousts with armored knights on horseback, along with demonstrations of medieval weaponry and fighting tactics.
More than 100 people are cast performers, acting out scenes and speaking with visitors in the medieval style, and the festival hosts a number of weddings and birthday celebrations during its two-month run.
Visitors can choose food from more than a dozen eateries, featuring everything from shepherds pie, salads and baked goods to fair food (steak on a stick and turkey legs) and different varieties of sweets, with roving vendors providing pretzels, pickles, ice cream and roasted nuts.
There are eight different taverns offering adult beverages, with the Cat and Fiddle Tavern holding twice-daily wine tastings.
Advance tickets ($22/adults, $8/children 5-12) are available online at SRFestival.com; tickets are $24/adults and $9/children at the gate, with free parking provided by Allen Samuels Autoplex of Ennis. Discount tickets are available at Tom Thumb grocery stores.
For more information, call (972) 938-3247, or check the website.

How redistricting works
By Michael Hannigan
Monitor Staff Writer

AUSTIN–Redistricting is undertaken every 10 years based on new census data to ensure House districts are balanced according to population.
The driving principal behind redistricting is the idea that districts need to be the same size to be truly representative.
According to a report produced by the Texas Legislative Council, “Significant population disparities between districts undermine the fairness of representative government and the principle of majority rule by giving the voters of underpopulated districts the same number of representatives, and thus the same political power, as the voters of overpopulated districts.”
The Legislative Council is a non-partisan agency created in 1949 to provide impartial research and information to lawmakers.
To get equal districts, the state takes the total population as provided by the new census and divides it by the number of House members to arrive at an optimal population per district.
The Redistricting Committee then starts redrawing the State House district map so that populations do not deviate from this number by more than 10 percent.
This is why Henderson and Kaufman counties can no longer be a district together – it would be too large.
Of course, there are many other factors exerting pressure on the Redistricting Committee when drawing the districts, including political considerations and the effort to join similar groups and communities together.
And there is also the county line rule. According to the Texas Constitution, while multiple House districts can be formed inside a county, lawmakers must have a very strong reason for cutting across a county line to draw a district.
In the map proposed last week, Henderson County is the only county to be divided lthis way — which goes a long way toward explaining why Henderson County commissioners are upset.
State officials have said the division is because of the size of Ellis County. The growth in that county, coupled with the size of its neighbors, necessitates taking a portion of another county to make the population numbers balance.
However, according to a Texas Legislative Council report on redistricting laws, “While state plans adopted in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s by both the legislature and the Legislative Redistricting Board sacrificed the county line rule when necessary to maintain an overall (population) deviation range of less than 10 percent, there does not appear to be a legal impediment to the state’s returning to a more strict compliance with the county line rule in 2011.”
Redistricting bills follow the normal legislative process. According to current rules, the last day to pass bills in the House is May 12 – so the process would have to kick into high gear in the next couple of weeks to meet the deadline.
Tuesday, the bill was passed out of the Redistricting Committee and is scheduled for floor debate next week.
If the House and Senate cannot pass redistricting plans in time – or the plans are found invalid – then the process is taken over by the Legislative Redistricting Board (LRB).
The LRB is composed of the lieutenant governor, speaker of the house, attorney general, comptroller, and land commissioner.

Two drug arrests made in Caney City
Monitor Staff Reports
CANEY CITY–Caney City Police Chief Kenneth Holder reports the arrest of two men April 15 on drug charges.
Officer C. Meyers observed a black Chevy truck traveling southbound on State Highway 198 and initiated a traffic stop into the Kamman’s Exxon parking lot.
The driver, Charles Ward, 24, of Kemp, spoke to the officer with slurred speech and kept rolling his head side to side and up and down. The officer believed Ward to be intoxicated.
A passenger, Glen Nicholas, 31, of Gun Barrel City also exhibited slurred speech and a strong smell of alcohol emitted from him. A records check found Nicholas’ driver’s license had been revoked for intoxication.
An inventory of the car revealed an open container of beer on the passenger side and a syringe in the panel of the driver’s side door, inside the center console the offier found an electronic scale commonly used to weigh narcotics, clear baggies and one bag containing an off-white powder believed to be a controlled substance.
Both men were charged with manufacture or delivery of controlled substance.
Ward has a lengthy drug arrest record, while Nicholas’ record is confined to intoxication charges, until now.
Both men posted $7,500 in bonds and were released the same day.

 
Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call
(903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com

 

 

 

 

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