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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the OranWhite Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

  Women Realtors hear new maps change flood plain boundaries
By Barbara Gartman
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–The magic number was 325 feet (above sea level) but now the elevation number has changed to 324, changing the flood plain for some areas around the lake.
Wednesday, impromptu speaker Gary L. Hardin, with Hardin Surveying in Mabank told WCR members “the new maps are out.”
Hardin volunteered as speaker for the monthly breakfast at Henderson County Women’s Council of Realtors, when the scheduled speaker was a no-show.
“The FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) revised the maps showing the lake area flood plain and released them to the public April 5.
“While the map distinguishes the flood plain, our lake area didn’t change all that much,” Hardin said.
The Realtors in attendance expressed concerns that total closing costs to buyer would be increased by the amount paid out for flood insurance.
The new map has the property markings and statistics in very small print, he said.
“Without a flood study I still can’t tell if the property is in the flood plain or not,” Hardin added.
In other business, members heard:
• the treasurer’s report, as presented, by treasurer Dianne Medlyn.
• bowling teams are being formed and the allotted number of lanes for the WCR are fast filling up, Jill Browne, president said.
• were reminded to attend the “Bunco game” fund-raiser June 17.

 

Tips for taking care of your dog in the summer weather
Special to The Monitor
MABANK–This time of year it’s hot outside, you should never take your dog with you in the car unless it’s someplace he needs to be (like your vet’s office).
You cannot leave the windows cracked enough to provide enough air for him. He can die within minutes of being left in a car. If you love your dog, then leave him at home.
Your furry friends come equipped with a fur coat. And in this heat they need some help, from you.
If you shave your dog’s coat or cut it down, then don’t let him get in the sun, dogs can get painful sunburns too.
Ideally, outdoor pets should be brought inside when the weather gets really hot.
But if you can’t bring them in, plan to protect your outdoor pets during this weather.
Make sure they always have fresh, cool water.
You might check it a couple of times a day in case it is gone or is too warm to drink.
Your outside pet will need lots of shade from the sun, and the sun moves (well, actually of course, the sun doesn’t move but you know what we mean) so if there’s shade in the morning, it doesn’t mean there will be shade in the afternoon.
If you walk your dog for exercise, do it only early in the morning, dogs can’t perspire to keep cool like humans can.
And that fur coat can be really hot.
Watch for signs of heat stroke in your dog or cat. Intense rapid panting, wide eyes, salivating, staggering or weakness. 
Advanced heat stroke victims will collapse and become unconscious. 
The gums will appear pale and dry. If heat stroke is suspected and you can take the animal’s temperature rectally, any temperature above 106 degrees is dangerous. 
The longer the temperature remains at or above 106 degrees the more serious the situation. 
If you return to your car or the area in which the animal was confined and find your pet seems to be highly agitated, wide-eyed and panting uncontrollably, start for the nearest animal hospital right away with the air conditioning at full blast. 
Otherwise get the dog to a cool area and begin the treatment for heat stroke.
You’re not seriously even thinking about taking your dog in the car during the summer, are you?
Do not take you dog in the car during the summer.
Heat stroke
It might only be ten minutes, and the dog or cat will be near death. 
And sometimes even if heroic treatment measures are taken the animal will die from massive intravascular clotting, hemorrhaging, cerebral edema and kidney failure. 
It is a gruesome thought but every day dogs and cats suffer from heat stroke due to inattention by their caretakers. 
In most cases, the pet is left “for just a minute.”
But for various reasons the pet’s owner is distracted by something unusual, or delayed beyond what was expected and returns to the vehicle to see their pet collapsed, salivating, panting uncontrollably and losing consciousness.  Don’t let it happen to your pet.
According to The Weather Channel your car acts like an oven when the sun is shining on it.  
And keep this in mind: if the outside temperature on a warm, sunny day is 90 degrees the temperature inside a car left in the sun in 10 minutes will climb to 113 degrees, in 20 minutes it will be 120 degrees, and in 30 minutes will be 133 degrees.
Leaving a gap open in the windows has little effect because the heat buildup occurs mainly from radiant energy from the hot metal of the car. 
The interior color of the car, dark being most troublesome, influences the heat buildup.
So do your pet a favor and leave him home.
Treatment for heat stroke
Take the pet’s temperature rectally, if possible. 
A body temperature of about 105 degrees or higher is probable evidence for heat stroke.
Place your pet in a tub of cool running water or spray with a hose being sure the cool water contacts the skin and doesn’t simply run off the coat. 
Thoroughly wet the belly and inside the legs. Run the cool water over the tongue and mouth. 
Take a rectal temperature if possible to know when to stop cooling. 
A safe temperature is about 103 degrees.  A small dog will cool down much faster than a large dog. 
Once the temperature gets to 103 or 104 degrees do not cool the pet any further because the cooling effects will continue to bring the temperature down even further. Seek veterinary attention as soon as possible.
If you are near an animal hospital, go there right away. 
At the animal hospital they may administer oxygen, cortisone and dextrose to help protect the traumatized cells. 
The staff can provide proper cooling measures and monitor the dog’s temperature, heart rate and provide oxygen which some evidence indicates may help protect stressed body cells. 
Providing intravenous fluids and anticoagulants may be utilized as well.
Your pets depend on you to keep them safe and protected – don’t let them down.

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
The domino effect is a chain reaction that occurs when a small change causes a similar change nearby, which then will cause another similar change, and so on. My name is Domino, and I got my name not only because I’m black and white like a domino tile, but also because my outgoing, cheerful personality causes my doggie roommates to smile. This also causes our human friends to smile, which even causes the kitties in the cat room to smile.
I am an 8-month-old male Pointer/Terrier mix. I love children, other dogs, and even get along great with kitties. I’ve had all my shots and am ready to be adopted. If you’d like to experience the domino effect, I am sure to put a forever smile on your face when you take me to my forever home.
I currently live with a foster family, so if you would like to meet me, call my friends at the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake at (903) 432-3422 to make an appointment. You can also email them at dogshsccl@yahoo.com.
 

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 

 



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