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Sunday,
August 14
, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 
Lake Area Billboard

East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.

Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.

Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.

Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.

Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.

Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets every Tuesday at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.

Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.

Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.

Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Monday of each month in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend. Call for times, (903) 498-2013, ext. 2.

Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.

Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.

Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.

Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.

Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.

Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.

Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.

Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.

Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the Oran White Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.

West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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People, Places & Events

Council names new interim police chief
By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer

EUSTACE–Eustace City Council members named officer Troy Tucker the interim police chief and accepted the resignation of police chief Robert Walker during a regular meeting Aug. 4.
Walker is leaving to take a lucrative offer with Halliburton Co., which involves a good bit of traveling and working away from home.
Tucker has worked as a Eustace police officer for about a year.

Monitor Photo/Pearl Cantrell
Outgoing Eustace police chief Robert Walker (right) congratulates officer Troy Tucker as his replacement. The council named Tucker the city’s interim police chief with the standard 90-day probationary period before naming him chief. “I had a good teacher,” Tucker said of Walker.

 “He has more experience than I had when I took up the chief’s job,” Walker told the council.
“I’ve had a good teacher,” Tucker said.
Mayor Elisha Sanders expressed the council’s thanks to Walker who has served the city since 2005.
“You’ve brought honor to our city and we thank you,” she said.
Tucker will serve as interim police chief during a probationary 90-day period at $14 per hour, at which time the council will evaluate his performance before naming him police chief.
Council members also hired Jordon Rouse to fill a general maintenance position.
After a lengthy closed-door session, the council choose one of the two finalists. The city had received 53 applications for the job, Sanders noted.
While other water providers have initiated drought contingency plans, Eustace utility director Gene Burns noted that Eustace has plenty of water.
With the fourth well at Stockard, drilled through two water tables and capable of pumping 140 gallons per minute, the city has much more water than it needs.
On average, the city is using 53,000 gallons per day, Burns said, well below the city’s trigger point of 402,000 gallons per day to initiate Stage 1.
At Burns’ suggestion, the council updated its drought contingency plans to include the fourth well. The trigger to initiate Stage 1 is set at 88 percent of total capacity of four wells, instead of three wells.
On a related matter, Burns pointed out the work being done throughout the city to fix pipe breaks, due to ground movement related to the dry conditions.
“The water department needs tools to do the work more efficiently,” he said.
The council approved expenditures up to $3,500 for the purchase of a metal detector, pipe cutter, electric pump and generator, work lights and a gas-powered saw.
In other business, the council:
• agreed to purchase asphalt up to $3,000.
• reinstated the city’s members in the Texas Rural Water Association.
• agreed to renew a collections contract with Henderson County Tax Office at 90 cents per parcel.
• tabled discussion on the FY 2011-12 budget.

Debt Ceiling agreement is step in right direction
More steps needed to balance budget
By Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison
Special to The Monitor

WASHINGTON–The debt ceiling agreement recently passed by Congress and signed into law by the President, while not perfect, is a step in the right direction.
Sensible spending cuts, not tax increases, are the right path to a balanced budget. Here’s the quick outline of the plan:
The agreement will cut nearly $1 trillion in federal spending during the next 10 years.
It also sets up a joint Congressional committee to recommend additional cuts of 1 trillion to 2 trillion.
The Committee’s recommendations must be finalized by Nov. 23 and must be approved or disapproved by Congress before Dec. 23, or $1.2 trillion in across-the-board cuts would be triggered, starting in 2013.
The only alternative to across-the-board spending cuts is Congressional approval of the Balanced Budget Amendment, which would require Congress and the White House to balance the federal budget.
I am a co-sponsor of the cut, cap and balance legislation, which includes the Balanced Budget Amendment.
It would reduce federal spending by as much as $6 trillion dollars over 10 years.
Unfortunately, it did not pass the Senate. I believe this legislation would have best served our nation’s long-term economic and national security interests.
The final debt limit agreement, although more limited in scope, is a step in the right direction.
The agreement rejects the tax-and-spend policies advocated by the White House and Democrat-controlled Senate and takes constructive steps in the direction of fiscal responsibility.
When the debt ceiling debate began several months ago, President Barack Obama called for a “clean” debt ceiling bill. This would have given the Obama administration a blank check to raise the national debt and increase spending by trillions of dollars.
It would have enabled the administration to follow through on its stated intention to finance its continued spending spree by boosting taxes to the highest levels in modern American history.
Fortunately, America’s common sense prevailed. Faced with a wave of opposition from across the county, the U.S. Senate unanimously rejected the Obama budget plan, (97-0).
After months of political posturing and maneuvering aimed at increasing spending and taxes, the White House and its Congressional allies finally succumbed to fiscal responsibility on Aug. 2, with approval of an historic new agreement.
The new legislation marks the end of automatic debt limit increases. It has no tax increases.
Instead, a new precedent has been created that will require the president and Congress to offset increased federal borrowing with spending cuts that are at least dollar-for-dollar match.
When President Obama was sworn into office, the national debt stood at $10.6 trillion – a stratospheric level. During only two and a half years of the Obama presidency, the national debt has risen to more than $14.3 trillion.
This almost inconceivable level of national debt is a heavy anchor on the American economy. It has stalled the job creation engine of our country and brought us to the brink of a double-dip recession.
This mountain of debt, combined with a tidal wave of bureaucratic federal regulations and the impending multi-trillion dollar costs of implementing Obama healthcare reform, has stalled job creation and economic growth in our country.
Instead of economic recovery, the Obama administration’s policies have increased unemployment by nearly one-fifth.
Nearly one American in 10 is unemployed today. The same policies have doubled the cost of gasoline, seen the number of Americans on food stamps swell to 45 million, and allowed home values to drop by 12 percent.
The debt ceiling agreement signaled an end to the status quo in Washington, D.C. Aug. 2.
Calls for fiscal responsibility from across Texas and across America are being translated into action.
The thinking in Congress and in the White House has begun to change from “how much can we spend, and how much can we raise taxes,” to “how much do we need to spend and what should be cut.”

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call
(903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com

 

 

 

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