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East Cedar Creek Freshwater Supply District meets at 12:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the ECCFSD office on Hammer Road just off Welch Lane in Gun Barrel City.
Eustace City Council meets at 7 p.m. in the Eustace City Hall the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 425-4702. The public is invited to attend.
Eustace Independent School District meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Eustace High School Library. For more information, please call 425-7131. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Council meets in Brawner Hall at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1087. The public is invited to attend.
Gun Barrel City Economic Development Corporation meets at 1831 W. Main, GBC, at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-1899.
Henderson County Commissioner’s Court meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens. The public is invited to attend.
Henderson County Emergency Services District #4 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 525 S. Tool Dr. in Tool.
Henderson County Historical Commission meets the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. in the HC Historical Museum.
Kaufman County Commissioner’s Court meets the first, second, third and fourth Monday of each month at 9:45 a.m. in the Kaufman County Courthouse in Kaufman. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp City Council meets at Kemp City Hall at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 498-3191. The public is invited to attend.
Kemp Independent School District meets the third Tuesday of each month in the Board Room in the Administration Building. For more information, please call 498-1314. The public is invited to attend.
Log Cabin City Council meets the third Thursday of the month in city hall. For more information, please call 489-2195. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Mabank City Hall the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 887-3241. The public is invited to attend.
Mabank Independent School District meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 887-9310. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs City Council meets at city hall at 7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 451-9229. The public is invited to attend.
Payne Springs Water Supply Corp. meets the third Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Payne Springs Community Center, located at 9690 Hwy. 198.
Seven Points City Council meets at 7 p.m. in Seven Points city hall the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3176. The public is invited to attend.
Tool City Council meets at 6 p.m. in the OranWhite Civic Center the third Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3522. The public is invited to attend.
West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District is held at 5 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month. For more information, please call 432-3704. The public is invited.
 

Campaign trail leads Texas gubernatorial hopeful to Kaufman
U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison stops for tea
By Barbara Gartman
Monitor Staff Writer

KAUFMAN–The senior United States Senator from Texas, Kay Bailey Hutchison, (R) stopped Friday, in Kaufman on one of her many campaign stops.
A small crowd, limited mostly by space, gathered at the Especially For You Tea Room, on the square.
Hutchison recently announced she is seeking the seat currently occupied by Gov. Rick Perry.
“The first thing I intend to do if elected governor is to ask that the term of governor be limited to two terms,” Hutchison told her audience.
The 14 years Perry has spent in office is much too long, she pointed out, giving as an example the number of appointments that can be made in that length of time.
Other items she discussed included taxes, health care and education.
Hutchison was elected to the U.S. Senate in June, 1993, in a special election, carrying 65 percent of the vote, following the resignation of Democratic Sen. Lloyd Bentsen.

Kemp Council passes school zone ordinance
By Barbara Gartman
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–The new Kemp High School, located on State Highway 274, poses traffic problems and a need to establish a school zone to protect both students and drivers.
At their Sept. 8 regular meeting, the Kemp City Council passed a new ordinance allowing a school zone to be incorporated into the city ordinance.
Actual speed limits will be worked out with the Texas Department of Transportation.
Recommendations from the state, given as an example, called for a speed limit of 50 mph from Harvey’s Exxon to 500 feet beyond the school.
Then a school zone can be established, with a speed 15 mph less than the regular speed (or 35 mph, for example).
But, council members said if a normal speed limit of 45 mph is set, then 30 mph can be set for the school zone.
Another problem is “walkers,” those students walking from the high school to an area that requires them to cross SH 274 on foot.
Several people in the audience spoke up, saying they had seen students dart across the road with little regard for traffic.
Councilwoman Barbara McFaul, who also teaches at the high school, agreed, saying she had also seen students cross the highway recklessly.
“I’m scared to death. I just hold my breath,” she said.
One problem that seems to be working out is traffic exiting the high school.
When pulling out of the high school parking lot, traffic must only turn right. So far, she has not seen anyone violate the rule, McFaul said.
In other business, council members:
• approved a “no parking” ordinance from Old Highway 40 to Tolosa Road.
• heard a report from Jody Deller, Economic Development Corporation president.
• heard a request for a variance to building setback rules for the Kemp sub-courthouse from Precinct 4 Commissioner Jim Deller.
“Seven years ago, when I took office, we expanded the courthouse, and thought this would be enough for the next 10 to 12 years,” Deller explained. “It isn’t. We have outgrown it.”
The office and courthouse need more storage space, Deller said.

State Fair of Texas begins
24 days of fun and excitement

By Barbara Gartman
Monitor Staff Writer

DALLAS–Grab your kids, a camera and some extra spending money, the State Fair of Texas is set to open its gates and the familiar, “Howdy Partner. Welcome to the State Fair of Texas,” greeting from Big Tex lets you know you have arrived.
Starting Friday, Sept. 25, the fair will run for 24 days, ending Sunday, Oct. 18.
General admission tickets are $15 and $11 for children under 48 inches tall. Senior citizens 60 and over are also $11, except on Thursdays when they are admitted free, compliments of The HealthSpring and Mature Texan Magazine.
Children under two are free.
Advance discount tickets are available at any Kroger store for $13.50, now on sale Also, season passes for $29.95 or a package deal for arriving at the fair by DART for $16 (a savings of $3, plus the price of parking).
For detailed information on discount tickets, calendar of events, featured entertainers go online at www.bigtx.com.
The exhibit buildings open at 10 a.m. and close at 10 p.m. Friday through Monday. The buildings close at 9 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
The Midway opening and closing times vary so call (214) 565-9931 then press 0 to speak to an information assistant.
Parking is available on official State Fair lots for $10 per space. Look for “Official State Fair Parking” signs. Valet parking is offered daily at Grand Avenue and on Saturdays and Sundays only at Haskell/Perry for $25.
This year The Oprah Winfrey Show will televise live from the fair on Monday, Oct. 12, refer to the website for detailed information on participating as part of the audience.
Of course, a perennial attraction at the State Fair is the food. There’s a lot of old favorites from barbecue and hamburgers to the historical favorite, Fletchers Corny Dog.
For the more adventurous there are the newer, deep-fried concoctions, ranging from deep fried Twinkies, Snickers and even deep fried coke.
This year, the new kid on the scene is deep fried butter.
Golf ball-sized rounds are enveloped inside bread dough to give that fresh-from the oven warm buttered bread comfort.
Visitors will be attracted to the warm, buttery smell given off as it is prepared.
The annual event is filled with competitions, exhibitions, entertainment and a lot of free attractions.
Free events include the beautiful landscaped grounds, various buildings filled with both old and new exhibits, and the livestock barns.
The Automobile Building, filled with every dealership imaginable, will introduce the newest cars to hit the highways, including the Camaro SS, the Corvette ZR-1, 2010 Fords, 2010 GMCs, the Toyota 4-Runner. and too many more to name.
Another free event is the 2009 Chevrolet Main Stage with daily presentations of entertainers from all over the state.
Starting at 8:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25 Jason Castro takes the stage; then on Saturday the Edwin McCain Band is featured.
The daily list continues with Joey plus Rory, en Vogue, Little Big Town and many others.
This season features several popular sports events in the Cotton Bowl.
Scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 30, are two soccer events: FC Dallas vs. New England and Mexico vs. Columbia.
Voted the best single sports event in 2008, the Texas-Oklahoma University game is set for noon Saturday, Oct. 17.
The State Fair of Texas started back in January, 1886 as the Dallas State Fair and Exposition with attendance that fall in excess of 100,000.
In the early years the exposition featured the finest racing stock, cattle sales, concerts, balloon assents, displays of farm machinery contests for ladies and a host of appearances by notables such as John Phillip Sousa, William Jennings Bryan, Carrie Nation and Booker T. Washington, attracting thousands to the fair.
Texas State Fair directors sold the fair property to the City of Dallas in 1904, with the stipulation that a period be set aside each fall for the annual exposition.
With a little reorganization and expansion, the park began to grow.
In 1930 the race track complex was torn down to make way for the 46,000-seat Fair Park Stadium, today known as the Cotton Bowl.
In 1936 the Centennial celebration was held in a transformed fairgrounds that was a masterpiece of art and imagination.
The celebration attracted more than six million people during a six-month run.
In 1988, the fair season was extended from 17 to 24 days, allowing visitors more time to take in a range of exhibits, entertainment and services unmatched by any annual exposition in North America.

 

Come Adopt Us At
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake
My name is Koal (aka Smarty Pants), and I’m a young orphan German Shepherd/Catahoula Leopard mix. I’m very proud to say that German Shepherds are the third smartest dog breed. I, however, beg to differ because I know I am smarter than any other dog in the world.
I am very true to my breed. German Shepherds are extremely intelligent, courageous, and have a very strong protective instinct. I would be a great guard dog. I am also a loving family companion and am excellent with children. I am an all-around fun guy who loves to rough house with my pals at the Shelter, then snuggle up to humans who can’t help but reach out to scratch my head every time they walk by.

We have many animals at the
Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake in Seven Points
in dire need of a good home.
Please call or stop by the Humane Society today
and rescue one of these forgotten animals.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake is located on
10220 County Road 2403 in Seven Points.
For more information, please call (903) 432-3422 after 11 a.m.
We are closed on Wednesday and Sunday.

For further information visit our website at petfinder.com


 


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