Aug

24

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 24, 2016

Ronald Johnson obitFuneral services for Ronald “Ronnye” Johnson were held August 24 at Anderson-Clayton Bros. Funeral Home in Kemp with Rev. Todd Peavy officiating. Interment followed the service at Baker Cemetery in Kemp.
Ronald was born on October 5, 1942 in Kemp to parents William Melton and Geneva (Pritchett) Johnson and entered into eternal rest on August 20, 2016.
Ronald was known as “Ronnye” and “Papa” to his family and friends. Ronnye loved spending time with his wife, children and grandchildren. He was a very loving and caring man. He was fun to be around, loved goofing around and being silly.
Ronnye was the outdoors type; he enjoyed riding four wheelers, fishing and sitting on the back porch. He also loved spending time with his dog Cady.
Ronnye served in the United States Navy. He retired from Austin Commercial in 2006. Ronnye was self employed as a heavy equipment operator and was known as the “Best” dozer operator in the area.
He was a Mason and Baptist by faith. Ronnye was a member of Calvary Baptist Church. He will be missed tremendously by those who knew and loved him.
Ronnye was preceded in death by his parents and brother Tommy Johnson.
He is survived by his loving wife Vickie Johnson of Kemp, daughter Mistie McNew and husband Charles of Mabank, daughter Dawnya House and Jason Andrews of Forney, son Sam Johnson and Patsy Fabela of Little Elm, grandchildren; Courtney Cubine of Fort Worth, Dalton Cubine of Eustace, Bailee House, Blair House and Daryl House all of Forney, Landen Johnson of Little Elm, great-grandchild Braylee Cubine of Eustace, sister Karen Perkins of Kemp, sister-in-law Laura Johnson of Tool, other loving family members and many more friends.
A personal tribute may be made online at www.andersonclaytonkemp.com

Aug

24

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 24, 2016

Monitor Staff Reports
KAUFMAN–As expected, burn bans in both Kaufman and Henderson counties were rescinded this early this week in view of the last seven days of rainfall throughout North Central Texas. Brush, branches, limbs, leaves and unpainted or untreated lumber are the only items that can be burned on open ground when there is not a burn ban, according to the Kaufman County Fire Marshal’s Office website. Anything else must be burned in barrels with a screen. Outdoor burning should always be attended with the proper safety precautions, such as having the ability to extinguish. No burning after sunset nor under windy conditions.
Kaufman County Commissioners have been reviewing a proposed budget they hope to adopt in September, which includes a $600 pay raise for county employees and funding of several new employee positions.
Public hearings are set for Sept. 6 and Sept. 12.
Though the budget includes nearly $3 million more than last year’s budget, commissioners aren’t proposing an increase in the operations portion of the property tax rate. However, when the county sells the remaining $26 million in voter-approved transportation bonds, the debt service part of the tax rate is expected to rise.
An increase of almost a penny is the “worst case” for the road bonds, depending on the interest rate at the time of its sale. The current debt tax rate is nearly 5 cents per $100 and it could go to nearly 6 cents for a total tax rate of 58.557 cents per $100.
The maintenance and operations tax rate has not seen a rise in the last six years, County Judge Bruce Wood noted at the Aug. 15 Commissioners Court meeting.
The budget also reflects a shift of more funds over to Road and Bridge, or about half a cent of the total property tax rate for a total of 52.65 cents per $100 valuation, same as last year.
Commissioners discussed awarding pay raises on a departmental basis to insure raises were for earned productivity and not just a matter of course, as would be the case if given to all on a certain percentage basis.
The budget has set aside $281,000 for pay raises.
Under the plan, a department that reduced staffing through efficiencies could use the money it saved to redistribute to the remaining employees. However, the plan wasn’t to include distributing funds for vacant positions to be filled. Commissioner Skeet Phillips will head a committee to determine the best way to apply proposed salary hikes.
Employee health insurance adds another $2334,700 to the budget.
New postings include two each in the office of the county clerk and public works and maintenance for six new positions and one each in the fire marshal’s office and district clerk.
As reported last week, the county budget is to include $72,449 to help fund the Star Transit bus and setting aside $250,000 to attract other funding for a county-owned animal shelter. The county’s current contract with the Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake expires Oct. 31. A new contract is proposed at a flat monthly fee of $11,500.

Aug

24

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 24, 2016

IMG_1888cmyk

By Erik Walsh
Monitor Staff Writer
KEMP–The Yellowjackets are back in the winner’s circle after claiming their first playoff berth since 2008.
“It felt good to make the playoffs last year,” said Head Coach Branson Hankins. “It felt good for the program and for the community. Now that the kids got a taste of the playoffs, they will be wanting more.”
The success brings a feeling of optimism that the Kemp football program hasn’t had in a long time.
“It’s a different feel around here,” Hankins said. “In the past we didn’t always know what we had, but now I know what we have in our kids and what they bring to the table. We are confident and we are hungry.”
The Yellowjackets will be channeling that hunger against a new set of district rivals. This year Kemp faces off against Sunnyvale, Scurry-Rosser, Dallas Madison, Grandview, Palmer and Maypearl. Gone are top-ranked Malakoff and Teague, and local rival Eustace. The move suits Hankins coaching staff just fine.
“We go back to the Dallas-area schools this time around and it fits us well,” he said. “We don’t have to travel as far and we like that.”
Top returning starters for Kemp this year are Elijiah Gardiner, Josiah Brewington, Kane Johnson, Dreyson Watters and Tyler Garrett. Big move-ins include Caleb Bolin and Taylor Little.
“We have a lot of guys that are helping us out and we’re excited about that,” Hankins said. “Some of the new players that came in from out of town will help us out, as well as the kids that have been here for four years. It’s a great vibe around here.”
Kemp will run a spread offense again this year with a 4-2-5 defense (four lineman, two linebackers and five in the secondary for pass defense). “It fits our kids and our personnel,” he said.
The ’Jackets hope to get prepared for district competition by facing preseason opponents Rio Vista, Mabank and Rice.
Hankins said the first few games of the season are pivotal even if they don’t count the district standings.
“It’s important to win some games right away and compete,” he said. “We know we have a lot to prove and we are excited to get out there and make it happen. When we strap on the pads we always want to win and improve each week. Staying healthy is important. If you’re not healthy in 2A or 3A football, it hurts with the numbers. We have some good depth now so we are going to get better and roll into district strong.”