Aug

17

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 17, 2014

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson Elaborate costumes are all part of the fun, but may have contributed to a young girl falling during the parade and being run over by one wheel of a trailer.

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson
Elaborate costumes are all part of the fun, but may have contributed to a young girl falling during the parade and being run over by one wheel of a trailer.


By David Webb
Monitor Correspondent

EUSTACE–The Eustace City Council continued discussion of a new parade ordinance designed to promote public safety at an Aug. 7 meeting.
The council tabled the ordinance until next month to incorporate new ideas. Mayor Elicia Sanders and Chief of Police Ken Holder are collaborating on a draft of the ordinance.
The proposed rule prohibits the throwing of any items, including gum, beads, paper or any other article from floats, vehicles or people on horseback. No one will be allowed to enter or exit floats, vehicles or other moving objects once the parade begins. It further defines a parade as any procession of people, animals or vehicles on public streets or alleys.
Any person or organization planning a parade must apply for a permit at Eustace City Hall and await approval or denial by the mayor or the mayor’s representative.
In other action, the council:
• learned from the mayor that repairs to the City Hall roof are faulty, and that Sun Roofing had not returned phone calls about honoring the warranty. Sanders said the city would no longer do business with Sun Roofing.
• approved city employee life insurance through Kansas City Life, and vision and dental coverage with United Healthcare. Last month, the council approved medical services insurance with Blue Cross Blue Shield.
• set 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20 for a presentation about a 2012 Texas Community Development Block planning grant of $32,565 for local city improvements to include maps, streets, zoning recommendations, parks and utilities. Public Management out of Cleveland will make the presentation.
• tabled consideration of the 2014-2015 fiscal year budget until next month.

Aug

17

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 17, 2014

Monitor Photo/James Robertson Eustace senior cross country runner Preston Schwartz returns to the Bulldogs team that secured a third place spot at the state meet last season.

Monitor Photo/James Robertson
Eustace senior cross country runner Preston Schwartz returns to the Bulldogs team that secured a third place spot at the state meet last season.


By Erik Walsh
The Monitor Sports Editor

EUSTACE-If it’s not hard, it’s not worth doing.
This is the attitude Eustace senior cross country runner Preston Schwartz comes with to practice every morning. And morning comes early for Eustace cross country runners.
Schwartz, along with the rest of the varsity team, arrive ready to train at 6:25 a.m. When many people are still counting sheep with the sandman, Schwartz has already kicked his routine into full gear. This is one of the numerous reasons the Bulldogs have been so successful. Schwartz doesn’t just understand the price of hard work and dedication; he embraces it.
“I love the constant dedication it requires to be good at cross country,” Schwartz said. “Other sports rely more on physical ability or talent, but cross country is all about the heart. Success in this sport mostly depends on how much the person wants it.”
And Schwartz wants it. The Bulldogs have tasted success, earning a place on the podium in the State Championship meet the past two years. He shows his dedication to his sport and fellow runners by coming to practice twice a day, putting in the extra work to gain and maintain top form and keeping a strict sleep and diet schedule.
“If you’re not sleeping enough, then you won’t run well,” he said. “It’s one of those little things that helps build the big things.”
He can easily run 10 miles a day between the two regular practices– four miles in the morning and 6 after school.
Every Monday the team issues what it calls a “distance challenge,” where the length of the run is amped up to 7-9 miles to push the runner’s limits.
Schwartz’s plans following high school graduation are to attend Texas A&M University, run a marathon and possibly join ROTC.
Schwartz is an Aggie at heart.
“Texas A&M is basically the one and only school I want to attend,” he said. “If I don’t get in, then I’ll go to an affiliate college.”
His reason for liking A&M are the same as his dedication to running.
“I really like tradition and hard work, I think they do that well,” he said. “I’m also thinking about joining ROTC, and they have a rich tradition of cadets there.”

Aug

17

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 17, 2014

Courtesy Photo Columbia Space Balloon Facility (CSBF) representative Kathleen Smith (from left) stands with NARFE member Bob Kral and Dolores Carter at the Aug. 12 meeting.

Courtesy Photo
Columbia Space Balloon Facility (CSBF) representative Kathleen Smith (from left) stands with NARFE member Bob Kral and Dolores Carter at the Aug. 12 meeting.


Special to The Monitor
TEXAS–Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF)in Palestine representative Kathleen Smith spoke to the National Active and Retired Employees (NARFE) Aug. 12, at the Sirloin Stockade in Corsicana.
The CSBF provides launch, tracking and control, airspace coordination, telemetry and command systems, and recovery services for large (400 foot in diameter) unmanned, high-altitude (120,000 fett) research balloons.
Their customers include National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) centers, universities, and scientific groups from all over the world. Balloon research provides a low cost alternative to rocket and space shuttle launches and provides flexibility as to launch locations.
CSBF has about 70 employees and conducts 20-25 balloon launches a year from permanent facilities in Palestine, New Mexico, Antarctica and Australia.
Other launches have been made from Sweden, Argentina, Greenland, Brazil, Canada, India, New Zealand and Sicily.
In more than 40 years of operation more than 2,200 balloon launches have been made for 124 universities and technical institutes. Payloads weigh up to 8,000 pounds.
CSBF was established in Boulder, Colo., in 1961, by the National Science Foundation (NSF)and moved to Palestine in 1963.
In 1982, sponsorship was transferred from the NSF to NASA.
In 1987, NASA’s contract to operate the facility was transferred to the Physical Science Laboratory of New Mexico State University.
The contract is administered by the Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility Balloon Program Office.
NARFE Chapter 1191 covers Ellis, Navarro and the adjacent parts of the surrounding counties.
For NARFE membership information, call the Corsicana office at (903) 874-3092.