May

27

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 27, 2016

By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
CEDAR CREEK LAKE—Those suffering with Parkinson’s disease and Multiple Sclerosis or even recent surgeries like knee or hip replacements have reported improved quality of life from participating in a new exercise program developed by a fellow sufferer. Gary Sobol, founder of GZSobol’s Parkinson’s Network, brought his program for the first time to Texas with about a dozen Cedar Creek Lake residents to certify them as teachers of his approach to living with these progressive conditions.
Employees of the Cedar Lake Home Health and Hospice met in Malakoff recently to train under Sobol for a daylong certification program. The first class for the public will be offered at Family Fitness in Gun Barrel City on June 6. What makes his program unique is it builds on the basics to build balance, strength and agility with cognition and voice exercises in an atmosphere of camaraderie and fun.
“I was most impressed about Mr. Sobol not just stopping and letting the disease take over; he was doing as much as he could to control it and he’s teaching others,” Mark Sulak, PTA, said. “It is so different to learn from someone who actually lives with the disease every day.”
“Being the first group in all of Texas to be able to offer these classes has us all so excited at the opportunities and doors this opens for patients with Parkinson’s, MS, TBI and CVA, as well as giving physicians other options for their patients,” RN Cindi Calloway told The News.
Testimonials from those introduced to this program out of Boulder, Colo. which began in 2012 are remarkable. Bob Shellenberger writes: “The class provides the motivation for getting out of bed and getting off the floor to getting out and doing stuff.”
Brenda Hutchinson said her friends have seen improvements in both her gross and fine motor skills, since she’s been taking the classes. “These programs gave me the strength and ability to bounce back from my recent knee replacement,” Gary Flebbe said. Joseph McDuff remarks that taking the classes helps him to feel better and taught him ways to deal with his condition better. “It has helped me a great deal,” he said.
As news of this approach to Parkinson’s, spread, Sobol said many class participants first started on the recommendation of their neurologist. Currently the program is available in eight states, counting Texas, of which Cedar Creek Lake is the first to offer it in Texas. Nearly 100 instructors have been trained and certified to lead the classes.
The program includes four different classes to meet the needs of people at various points in their strength development.
The Foundations class is where everyone begins. This class focuses on strength building, balance and flexibility, which normally decline with age, but in PWP’s they decline at an accelerated rate. In addition, the exercises are enhanced by including cognition, voice and fun. The 75-minute class includes a head-to-toe 20-minute warm up (seated). The remaining time is spent performing a variety of unique standing exercises and routines. Participants are encouraged to do as much as possible and rest when necessary. PWP’s who come to class in a wheelchair or using a walker are required to have their caregiver or driver stay with them during the class. In order to receive the most benefit, participating 2-3 times weekly is recommended. Those who improve function and maintain improved function are committed to attending class regularly. Participants who come only sporadically report a decline in function.
“We can’t stress enough the importance of specific regular exercises to help fight the devastating effects of Parkinson’s disease. This class may help you feel that you have some control over the disease,” Sobol said.
“My husband (who has Parkinson’s disease) had lost a lot of movement before he started taking Gary’s class two years ago and was discouraged. Attending the Foundations (formerly Boot Camp) class made him realize the importance of regular exercise, and it motivated him to keep moving and trying. Now two years later he is fairly flexible and mobile,” reports Sandra Honomich. “This year, I started going to the classes with him and I enjoy them myself. The ‘sense of community’ among the Parkinson’s group is something I haven’t seen elsewhere. It’s inspiring to see the way attendees laugh, share experiences and help one another. They’ve helped my husband remain optimistic. I am grateful–Thank you Gary!”
Those that complete at least six weeks in the Foundations class, may then advance to the Circuit class which introduces a series of stations that participants rotate through. Each station has specific activities to perform that will help the participant add power, strength and greater agility instead of succumbing to greater weakness and clumsiness. It also adds variety and challenge to the workout. The program recommends adding this class at the right time, instead of replacing the Foundations class.
The full class offerings also include dance class, yoga and tai chi, and a seated class to meet the needs of the widest number of people exhibiting the different stages of the debilitating disease.
“Our vision is that every person in this country with Parkinson’s should have a place that they can go to, to take these classes and improve their quality of life and restore lost functions,” Sobol said. “If you are currently living in a location where classes are not yet offered please contact us at info@parkinsonsnetwork.org. We will contact you and figure out a way we can bring this program to your city. The results of these classes, in term of what it has done for me, have been dramatic which is why I want to bring these classes to multiple cities. I want everyone with Parkinson’s to have the same opportunity I had to restore these functions.”
The first class in the area is free and will begin at 12:30 p.m. Monday, June 6 and last for 75 minutes. The continuance of this offering will greatly depend on interest in and enrollment for these classes. It will be held at Family Fitness, located 121 E. Main St. Wear light clothing, come early to register. For more information, call (903) 802-7376, or Cedar Lake Home Health at (903) 489-2043.

May

27

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 27, 2016

63 Mabank ISD Honor Choir Members from the lower grade levels sing in the capitol rotunda May 19.

63 Mabank ISD Honor Choir Members from the lower grade levels sing in the capitol rotunda May 19.


By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
MABANK–It’s another first for Mabank ISD students.
It started on Wednesday, May 18. An honor choir made up of 65 students from all three elementary schools and the intermediate competed against 19 other school choirs at Sandy Lake and earned a sweepstakes rating and were voted Most Outstanding Performance. One of the judges asked when was the district going to submit this choir to perform for TMEA, the Texas Music Educators Association?
Rarely has there ever been a 4A or smaller school asked to perform during the association’s February convention held in San Antonio. Mostly larger school districts and colleges are invited to perform, after a thorough application process.
The group of youngsters left their schools at 5:30 a.m. to join the rainy rush hour traffic and were unaffected to perform at 9 a.m., their director, Catherine Lindsley told The Monitor. “We are so proud of them, bringing home not one, but two trophies!”
The next morning, the same group of youngsters again left on buses at 5:30 a.m., this time to go to Austin. Once again, it was a rainy trip through rush-hour traffic, this time on I-35, which narrowed to one lane due to flooding. Mabank students lined up under the Capitol rotunda and sang beautifully for a 20-minute concert, according to Lindsley. Their selections included “America, our Home;” “God Bess America;” “Music Fills the Air” by Mabank songwriter Kelly Lindsley and “Guide Us, Lord.”
The Austin trip also included some sightseeing, with the choir singing one verse of “Guide Us, Lord” in the McDonald’s where they ate, bringing tears to the assistant manager’s eyes. “The kids were very impressed with that,” Catherine Lindsley related. The group also sang during their visit to the InnerSpace Cavern.
The group, which included 24 chaperones, also went to Main Event Austin, an entertainment venue similar to Whatz-Up, returning to Cedar Creek Lake the following day.
The Honor Choir also performed before a home audience Tuesday night at the Mabank High School Auditorium. Their music directors include Kay Williams of Central Elementary, Aubrey Presley from Southside, Donna Hicks, Lakeview; and Hilary Bounds, directing at Mabank Intermediate and Junior High.
“I’ve never before directed a choir this young,” Catherine Lindsley said. “But it has been a surprising joy to work with the MISD Honor Choir this year. They are wonderful kids who rose to the occasion in a special way.”

May

27

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 27, 2016

63 Mabank ISD Honor Choir Members from the lower grade levels sing in the capitol rotunda May 19.

63 Mabank ISD Honor Choir Members from the lower grade levels sing in the capitol rotunda May 19.


By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
MABANK–It’s another first for Mabank ISD students.
It started on Wednesday, May 18. An honor choir made up of 65 students from all three elementary schools and the intermediate competed against 19 other school choirs at Sandy Lake and earned a sweepstakes rating and were voted Most Outstanding Performance. One of the judges asked when was the district going to submit this choir to perform for TMEA, the Texas Music Educators Association?
Rarely has there ever been a 4A or smaller school asked to perform during the association’s February convention held in San Antonio. Mostly larger school districts and colleges are invited to perform, after a thorough application process.
The group of youngsters left their schools at 5:30 a.m. to join the rainy rush hour traffic and were unaffected to perform at 9 a.m., their director, Catherine Lindsley told The Monitor. “We are so proud of them, bringing home not one, but two trophies!”
The next morning, the same group of youngsters again left on buses at 5:30 a.m., this time to go to Austin. Once again, it was a rainy trip through rush-hour traffic, this time on I-35, which narrowed to one lane due to flooding. Mabank students lined up under the Capitol rotunda and sang beautifully for a 20-minute concert, according to Lindsley. Their selections included “America, our Home;” “God Bess America;” “Music Fills the Air” by Mabank songwriter Kelly Lindsley and “Guide Us, Lord.”
The Austin trip also included some sightseeing, with the choir singing one verse of “Guide Us, Lord” in the McDonald’s where they ate, bringing tears to the assistant manager’s eyes. “The kids were very impressed with that,” Catherine Lindsley related. The group also sang during their visit to the InnerSpace Cavern.
The group, which included 24 chaperones, also went to Main Event Austin, an entertainment venue similar to Whatz-Up, returning to Cedar Creek Lake the following day.
The Honor Choir also performed before a home audience Tuesday night at the Mabank High School Auditorium. Their music directors include Kay Williams of Central Elementary, Aubrey Presley from Southside, Donna Hicks, Lakeview; and Hilary Bounds, directing at Mabank Intermediate and Junior High.
“I’ve never before directed a choir this young,” Catherine Lindsley said. “But it has been a surprising joy to work with the MISD Honor Choir this year. They are wonderful kids who rose to the occasion in a special way.”